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SERVICE DOG ALLIANCE -
Events, Seminars and Workshops

The written portion of all seminars and workshops can be purchased here.  Events will show on the calendar and all are welcome to come.

Service Dogs - The Essentials and the Extraodinary

By law, service dogs are much more then just a pet. Service Dogs save lives. They give to their humans freedom that the human would not otherwise have because of a disability.

In the beginning there were only guide dogs for the blind and hearing dogs for the deaf. Since the late 1990's, all that started to change.

Learn about the new breed of Service Dog, how they are trained and the range of services they can be trained to provide. 

Self-Control Games for Service Dogs

Self-control for service dogs goes above and beyond that which is required of a well-trained pet dog.  

Service dogs must remain calm under as many situations as it is possible to train for.  People rarely think how the average dog would react to such situations. Fewer still imagine the amount of specialized training required before we can rest assured that our service dogs are “bomb proof” and basically invisible in public.

Public Access Behavior and  Ethics

This webinar will cover public access service dog ethics and standards for a service dog’s behavior when working in public. Disabled handlers have ethical responsibilities to uphold the standards for the sake of their dog’s safety and welfare. They must also consider the impact of poor behavior on the businesses the dogs enter; and recognize that a poorly behaved service dog in public may make other service dog partners less welcome.

Selecting and Training Medical Alert Dogs

A good Medical Alert Dog (MAD) comes from the delicate balance of certain temperament traits coupled with sound training methods. But even with the best of training, unless the dog already possesses certain qualities, s/he may not perform as needed. We’ll discuss the different sources of dogs, from breeding programs to working with shelter and rescue dogs, and how to identify those with the required personality traits. 

Service Dog Handlers – Can Anyone Handle a Service Dog?

Before partnering with a Service Dog, there are several important points to consider. While thousands of individuals with a disability benefit greatly from partnering with a Service Dog, it’s not the solution for everyone. If you or a loved one is considering full-time Service Dog partnership, please ask yourself the 5 questions from this lecture before making a final decision.

Intelligent Disobedience and Problem Solving

Intelligent disobedience occurs where a service animal trained to help a disabled person goes directly against the owner's instructions in an effort to make a better and usually safer decision. This behavior is a part of the dog's training and is central to a service animal's success on the job. The concept of intelligent disobedience has been in use and a common part of service animals' training since at least 1936 when guide dogs for the blind needed to be able to perceive danger when the human couldn’t.

Identifying Stress in Service Dogs and the Canine Emotional Detox

Stress is the body’s way of responding to any kind of demand or threat. When a dog feels threatened, his nervous system responds by releasing a flood of stress hormones which includes adrenaline and cortisol. These hormones rouse the body for emergency action. The heart pounds faster, muscles tighten, blood pressure rises, breath quickens, and all senses become sharper. These chemical changes increase strength, stamina, reaction time, and enhance focus.

Psychiatric Service Dogs 

One in four Americans suffers from mental illness – yet less than a third of those people will receive treatment, often due to financial barriers and the stigma around mental health. The expansive need and demand for psychiatric service dogs exceeds the organizations, individuals adequately trained and knowledgeable in this specialized field. Join us in this webinar designed to educate dog trainers, mental health professionals and everyone impacted by mental illness in navigating the complicated world of psychiatric service dogs.

Fondation Skills For Service Dogs

Service dogs work independently and are highly intelligent. Their working/obedience and instinctive intelligence are near the top of the canine chart. Their “bid ability”, taking direction from a human, makes them exceptionally trainable as well as companionable.Foundation skills provide a solid ethic for obedience, self control, retrieving, recall, scent games and proper social skills.

Learn about the games that engage prey drive, develop proper social skills, stimulate the high level of working intelligence and supports an engaging as well as mutually respectful relationship between dog and handler which is necessary for a service dog..

Puppy Learning Games for Service Dog Candidates

From the time a puppy is 3 weeks old, they should be learning about the human world. They should also still be learning dog lessons from their mother and from litter mates.

Learn what it takes to raise a balanced dog and what to look for when you first adopt an 8 week old puppy. You will know how that puppy was raised with just 3 tests.

Once you have your puppy, learn how to raise it so that when you start training for service, everything is in place and the dog ready for it's job.

Communication and Emotion in Your Service Dog

Like any relationship, effective communication is key to working together. And, at its core, emotion is fundamentally a means of communication. Our facial expressions and body movements give others a glimpse inside our heads, often whether we like it or not. For dogs to live with us, they need to learn to understand both our verbal and nonverbal messages — staying away from humans who looked angry, for example.
And conversely, we need to learn about their communication skills.

Training Methods and Equipment - When is a Service Dog Fully Trained

Service dogs must be handler-focused, desensitized to distractions, and highly trained to do specific tasks. They should not be distracted by the public, as they should focus solely on their owner when working. For service dogs, training can last up to two years before they are placed with a client. Most importantly, in order to fully do the job or jobs they have been trained for, they must not be distracted by the equipment hanging on their bodies.

Selecting and Training a Service Dog for Mental Illness Part I

The lecture will offer an overview of the most salient temperament qualities of successful service dogs for people with PTSD, anxiety, depression and other mental illnesses; offer suggestions about how and where to locate canine candidates; and who should evaluate and train puppies and older dogs under consideration to become service dogs. We will also discuss how dog breeds influence choices of canine candidates.

Selecting and Training a Service Dog for Mental Illness Part II

. In Part II, we will discuss essential public access skills, and tasks appropriate to mitigate some mental illness symptoms. We will also offer caveats about the risks posed by training some tasks that are less appropriate for mitigating symptoms. For example, if the handler is unconscious, in a dissociative state, or having a psychotic break, or for other reasons unable to speak in their own best interest, some trained tasks may require that the dog “take charge”. Such an expectation may be unfair to the dog, unethical, and or put the dog in danger.

Equipment For A Service Dog

Service dogs must be handler-focused, desensitized to distractions, and highly trained to do specific tasks. They should not be distracted by the public, as they should focus solely on their owner when working. For service dogs, training can last up to two years before they are placed with a client. Most importantly, in order to fully do the job or jobs they have been trained for, they must not be distracted by the equipment hanging on their bodies.

ADDRESS
2760 N Haskell Dr
Tucson, AZ 85716

CONTACTS
Email: jamie@accesstoservice.org
Phone: 727-686-4246

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